Raising Capital for Your Startup: It’s About More Than Money

Most of the time for most entrepreneurs, raising money for a startup is not a lot of fun. Absent some combination of a hot deal and a hot market, fundraising is a real chore, too often full of demoralizing turndowns and even more demoralizing walls of silence. Still, as bad as it can be, the process almost always includes some important opportunities that good entrepreneurs will seize and use to their advantage.

The first opportunity the capital chasing process offers is self-reflection. Asking other folks for risk capital forces you (at least if you expect any success) to think about your business objectively, from the perspective of an outsider. And not just any outsider, but a jaded professional investor. Vision and passion are certainly appreciated by most of these folks, but as table stakes, not closing arguments. To seal a deal, you will need to get back to the cold hard realities of your value proposition, your business model, your evolving competition, your financing plan, and your exit strategy. Mission critical stuff that can get lost in the fire drill of day-to-day startup life.

Another opportunity worth grabbing on to in the fundraising process is the learning opportunity. If you have been at all careful about qualifying your investors, you will be talking to folks who very likely know a lot about the environment – technology, competitive, financing, exit, etc. – your startup is living in. If you listen carefully, and ask good questions (you should, in all events, be vetting potential investors as much as they are vetting you), you will almost certainly learn a lot of valuable information from the fundraising process, as much or even more so from investors who turn you down.

Finally, the fundraising process will give you valuable feedback on your teams’ capabilities, collectively and independently, in an area – raising capital – that will only become more important as your capital needs grow on the road to your exit. Raising capital is a skill in its own right – indeed as mission critical a skill as there is. Getting a periodic handle on where your team measures up in that regard may not be worth the trouble in and of itself, but when you need the money you might as well get as much besides money as you can out of the process.

Approaching the fundraising process as a learning opportunity, as well as a way to generate needed capital, may not make the effort any more fun. But it can make it a lot more rewarding.

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