Is Your VC a Chicken or a Pig? Part II: The Role of the Lead Investor – From Term Sheet to Closing (and Beyond)

In Part I we talked about the critical importance of focusing your fund raising efforts on identifying a lead investor – a “pig” – and reaching agreement on a term sheet with them before you spend significant time lining up “chickens” to “follow” along in the deal. Today, we’ll look at what role your lead investor plays post-term sheet agreement when it comes to getting your deal closed.

The first role of the lead investor post-term sheet is working with the company to build out the investment syndicate: that is, to find and close on chickens/followers. The lead becomes, in effect, a part of your pitch team – albeit, without abandoning its primary role as an arms-length investor/skeptic.

The “selling” role of the lead includes identifying, prioritizing, and even pitching potential followers. That typically includes folks the lead brings to the table from its own network as well as appropriate candidates the company suggests. While the company will still be front and center in pitching chickens, the lead is usually the primary due diligence source for potential followers, both “deal” and “legal” due diligence, and actively shares their own thinking on why the deal is compelling with various chickens.

This dual role, working with the company to build the syndicate while also being the principal due diligence resource for the syndicate, makes managing the company/lead relationship complicated as well as critical. The lead, at this point, wants the deal to happen and is committed to making it happen. But only to a point. The lead’s enthusiasm is tempered by its continuing obligation to act in the best interests of its own investors. In addition, its credibility is on the line with other investors, which is something that can cut both ways in terms of how it reacts to any bumps in the road on the journey to closing.

The lead also manages the “deal” part of the deal: that is, the concerns of followers about the terms of the deal. On that score, the lead should focus on convincing followers that the term sheet is “good to go” as is. Indeed, the company should resist any material changes to the term sheet based on follower concerns, just as it would if the lead was the only investor. The whole point of agreeing on a term sheet was to finalize the material terms of the deal. As a practical matter, one or more immaterial changes to accommodate a valuable follower may be acceptable. Any material changes, though, should be viewed as putting in play changes the company might want in exchange, or even grounds for the company backing out of the deal altogether.

The lead also manages the legal process associated with negotiation of closing documents and related legal requirements. Typically, there is one counsel for the investment syndicate, and that counsel works through the lead investor and is paid by the company out of closing proceeds from the financing. (If a follower wants to have an independent legal review, they should pay for it, and that counsel should work through the lead and its counsel in terms of communicating any concerns to the company.) If a lead can’t persuade followers to work through the lead and its counsel, that’s a good sign that the lead is not up to the job.

Once the deal is closed, the lead is usually the “point” investor for the rest of the investment syndicate. If the investors have a director on the Board, it will usually be someone from the lead investor. (Someone that should have been identified at the term sheet stage). When the company has news to share with the investors – good, bad, or indifferent – the lead is usually the first to get it, and often has input on what to share with the rest of the syndicate, when, and how. As with the period of time from the term sheet to the closing, this dual role of investor/advisor can be complex and must be managed carefully.

Lead investors make deals happen, and typically play central roles even after the closing. Smart entrepreneurs know that raising money is first and foremost about getting a credible lead’s name on a solid term sheet. Be a smart entrepreneur: don’t waste time and energy collecting followers until you’ve got a lead for them to follow.

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