Jones: Alas, here is still not there

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “Jones: Alas, here is still not there” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

“‘Over the course of the past two years, the median pre-money valuation for seed-stage financings was $6 million and the median deal size was approximately $2 million.’

So reports Mark Suster, partner at Upfront Ventures, in a fourth quarter 2016 venture capital market report by Cooley, LLP, one of Silicon Valley’s leading law firms. (They also reported serving as counsel for 187 venture capital financing involving $2.7 billion in the fourth quarter: yes, Virginia, the rich really are different.)

Clearly, the seed deal market in Wisconsin – where my sense is that the median pre-money seed round valuation is something more like $1 million, and the median seed deal size more like $300k – is a bit of an outlier. As are most flyover country markets. That said, here are some things these numbers got me thinking about.”

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Jones: Hard truth about angel investing

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “Jones: Hard truths about angel investing” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

“Angel investing is a critical part of the high impact startup world, particularly outside of the big venture capital centers. A good portion of Wisconsin startup success stories achieved liftoff with critical assistance from angel investors and their capital.

But what about the angel investors themselves? How does angel investing work for them?

Well, you don’t have to look very hard to find blogs, books and speakers extolling the virtues of angel investing for the angels. And a lot of them make a pretty good case that the angel investing community makes a nice profit for its efforts. A good case, but also a misleading case.”

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Montana’s Robust Startup Scene

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “Montana’s Robust Startup Scene” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

“Folks at the Kauffman Foundation – one of the more credible of the various organizations that track entrepreneurship activities across America – recently ranked the various states in terms of the strength of their entrepreneurial sectors. As gener8tor’s Joe Kirgues wryly noted, “at least Wisconsin finished in the top 50.” Which is to say, 50th.

I must say I am not a huge fan of these kinds of rankings. Frankly any ranking of this sort that doesn’t have Northern California at the top of the list is more than a little suspect. Still, by chance I happened to be in Missoula Montana last week, working with several startups at Montana Technology Enterprise Center, or MonTEC, the University of Montana’s technology accelerator. That Montana. The Montana that Kauffman put at the top of its list of states ranked by the strength of their entrepreneurial sectors.

In a lot of ways, Montana is a lot like Wisconsin, only more so. It is hard to get to. The climate is challenging. Not a lot of people live there. And there are no big cities (in fact, there are no cities as “big” as Green Bay). There is just one institutional venture capital investor. It’s fair to say, I think, that Montana’s challenges, in terms of building a high impact entrepreneurship sector, are even more formidable than those facing Wisconsin.”

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Those Who Do it All… Shouldn’t

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “Those Who Do it All…Shouldn’t” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

“In more than thirty years in and around the high impact entrepreneur and investing space, I’ve come to the conclusion that every entrepreneur, even and in fact particularly the most successful, has at least one serious personality flaw.

One of the more common flaws is the “I can do it all” personality: the entrepreneur who insists that they are not only good at, but the best at everything involved with making their business a success.

What really makes the “I can do it all” entrepreneur so frustrating is not so much that they are almost always wrong about their capabilities. Rather it is that even if an entrepreneur really is the best at everything actually doing everything is still a bad idea.”

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Look Before You Leap

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “Look Before You Leap” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

Being a high impact entrepreneur is kind of like being a sports star: everybody wants to be one; almost no one credits how much work is involved.

The time “in the spotlight” is like the shining tip of the iceberg: most of the actual work is below the surface, where the environment is mostly cold and dark.

My object here is not to discourage anyone from making the jump to high impact entrepreneurship: we need as many folks at the top of the funnel as we can get. Rather it is more of a “look before you leap” message.

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What Good VCs (Don’t) Do

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “What Good VCs (Don’t) Do” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

Venture capitalists are not the most popular folks in the entrepreneurial community, for a lot of reasons, some of which are understandable if not necessarily good.

At least one reason for not liking VCs is clearly a good one, albeit one that doesn’t apply to most VCs. The reason is this: Some VCs take compensation – cash, equity, etc. – for serving on the Board of Directors of their portfolio companies, or for providing the kind of “value added” mentoring and networking that good VCs routinely provide. That’s just wrong.”

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Freedom is Just Another Word for Nothing Left to Lose — sung by Janis Joplin, “Me & Bobby McGee”

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “Freedom is Just Another Word for Nothing Left to Lose – sung by Janis Joplin, “Me & Bobby McGee” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

High impact entrepreneurs come to the arena with a wide range of handicaps their bigger, established competitors largely don’t face.

Startups are notoriously short of capital, talent and time. They typically compete with better-armed, established businesses with ample capital and human resources, and substantial brand equity. It is a wonder, to me, that even a small portion of startups succeed.

But they do. And so you have to ask how. How can small, undercapitalized startups with nothing but ideas and small overmatched teams, in the space of a few short years, not just compete in, but win sizeable markets. They must, it seems to me, have some advantages; some assets that, when properly deployed, more than make up for their obvious liabilities. What are those assets?

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