gener8tor: The Gift That Keeps on Giving

It’s been a few years now since I wrote my first appreciation for the folks at gener8tor.  Back then, they had just launched, and yours truly was surprised (albeit very pleasantly) that they had gotten not just off the ground but had achieved some sort of seemingly stable orbit.  Which surprised a bunch of people, I think.  I know it surprised me.

Well, here we are in November 2017 and they have flown well beyond Madison and Milwaukee to places as far afield as Minnesota, Illinois and even my own neck of the woods up here in Packerland.  Recently, it was my good fortune that a scheduled speaker for a OpenBETA Lunch program in Oshkosh had a last minute scheduling conflict.  My good fortune in that I was offered an opportunity to substitute as the headliner for the event.

The Oshkosh event was a lot like my first time at gener8tor way back when in Milwaukee.  Quirky space, a roomful (well, ok, maybe a half-dozen plus) of raw but passionate and very early-in-the-process entrepreneurs.  Who asked good questions, and shared some good ideas.

What was most interesting about the event, for me, was in fact how it took me back to those early gener8tor classes, where the entrepreneurs were rawer than raw, and the ideas sketchier than sketchy.  And, in fact, what amazed me about gener8tor then – and caused me to write my initial blog about the program and team – was how over the couple of months after I saw that cohort of newbies the gener8tor folks had somehow worked some magic to turn them into that rarest of commodities hereabouts, fundable high impact entrepreneurs.  (And, yes, they all got funded.)

Since those times, gener8tor’s flagship program has expanded to new places and moved a bit downstream in terms of appealing to less raw, even semi-polished entrepreneurs (often hailing from well beyond Wisconsin).  And I’ll admit, I had (and to a limited extent still have) some doubts about whether they can sustain their success across multiple markets and with later stage entrepreneurs.  But the results continue to speak for themselves, and if we – that is those of us who are serious about growing the high impact entrepreneurship and investing community in our little corner of flyover country – are lucky gener8tor has a lot of fuel left in the tank.

All of that said, what really made my day at the OpenBETA event was seeing gener8tor staying true to its “rawest of the raw” roots, and doing it in the New North.  In Oshkosh even.  (They also have a new gBeta program in Green Bay.)   That means, I think, that it won’t be long until entrepreneurs and investors in Madison and Milwaukee start  realizing there are deals to be done in Wisconsin in places other than Madison (mostly) and Milwaukee.

And so congratulations to all of us in the high impact entrepreneurship and investing community across Wisconsin.  We are the lucky benefactors of the gener8tor program – the gift that keeps on giving.

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Those Who Do it All… Shouldn’t

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “Those Who Do it All…Shouldn’t” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

“In more than thirty years in and around the high impact entrepreneur and investing space, I’ve come to the conclusion that every entrepreneur, even and in fact particularly the most successful, has at least one serious personality flaw.

One of the more common flaws is the “I can do it all” personality: the entrepreneur who insists that they are not only good at, but the best at everything involved with making their business a success.

What really makes the “I can do it all” entrepreneur so frustrating is not so much that they are almost always wrong about their capabilities. Rather it is that even if an entrepreneur really is the best at everything actually doing everything is still a bad idea.”

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Look Before You Leap

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “Look Before You Leap” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

Being a high impact entrepreneur is kind of like being a sports star: everybody wants to be one; almost no one credits how much work is involved.

The time “in the spotlight” is like the shining tip of the iceberg: most of the actual work is below the surface, where the environment is mostly cold and dark.

My object here is not to discourage anyone from making the jump to high impact entrepreneurship: we need as many folks at the top of the funnel as we can get. Rather it is more of a “look before you leap” message.

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What Good VCs (Don’t) Do

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “What Good VCs (Don’t) Do” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

Venture capitalists are not the most popular folks in the entrepreneurial community, for a lot of reasons, some of which are understandable if not necessarily good.

At least one reason for not liking VCs is clearly a good one, albeit one that doesn’t apply to most VCs. The reason is this: Some VCs take compensation – cash, equity, etc. – for serving on the Board of Directors of their portfolio companies, or for providing the kind of “value added” mentoring and networking that good VCs routinely provide. That’s just wrong.”

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Freedom is Just Another Word for Nothing Left to Lose — sung by Janis Joplin, “Me & Bobby McGee”

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “Freedom is Just Another Word for Nothing Left to Lose – sung by Janis Joplin, “Me & Bobby McGee” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

High impact entrepreneurs come to the arena with a wide range of handicaps their bigger, established competitors largely don’t face.

Startups are notoriously short of capital, talent and time. They typically compete with better-armed, established businesses with ample capital and human resources, and substantial brand equity. It is a wonder, to me, that even a small portion of startups succeed.

But they do. And so you have to ask how. How can small, undercapitalized startups with nothing but ideas and small overmatched teams, in the space of a few short years, not just compete in, but win sizeable markets. They must, it seems to me, have some advantages; some assets that, when properly deployed, more than make up for their obvious liabilities. What are those assets?

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Two Cheers for Cheerleading

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “Two Cheers for Cheerleading” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

Esprit de corps is a good thing. Building strong morale is an important part of building a winning team, on the battlefield, on the playing field and in business. And cheerleading can be a worthwhile part of plans for building esprit de corps.

Celebrating high performance is a good way to encourage high performance, and encouraging high performance is, finally, the ultimate objective of cheerleaders.

So far, so good. There is a problem, though, when the folks doing the cheerleading go overboard, in the sense that they confuse the role of cheerleading with the role of honest assessment and communication. It’s bad enough when people – including entrepreneurs – start believing their own press releases. It’s worse when they start listening to cheerleaders who confuse enthusiasm and energy with success.”


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You’re So Vain

Paul Jones, co-chair of Venture Best, the venture capital practice group at Michael Best, has been selected as a regular contributor of OnRamp Labs, a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel blog covering start-ups and other Wisconsin technology news. Paul’s most recently contributed piece, “You’re So Vain” can be found under their Business Tab in the Business Blog section: Click here to view his latest blog.

A short excerpt can be found below:

I am often asked what some of the big obstacles are in terms of building a self-sustaining high impact entrepreneurship and investing sector in the Badger State. Two of the popular candidate answers, not that popularity means a lot, are a lack of capital and a lack of talent.”

 Click here to read more.